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Posts tagged with: fedora

Fix Firefox fullscreen video bug on Gnome 3

Does this sound like a familiar scenario?: You’ve found your favourite Seinfeld clip, you’ve waited for it to buffer, you’ve clicked fullscreen mode, swiftly alt-tabbed to check your mail (the thousandth time today), switched back into Firefox, clicked fullscreen again, only to find the comedy genius’ face has vacated your screen, or frozen, glass-eyed and unanimated, as the sound plays on? Seinfeld may be impossible to dislike, but this bug certainly isn’t.

Seinfeld clip on TouTube screenshot

Seinfeld’s “The Deal” in Firefox

To put the problem another way, fullscreen video only works the first time it’s attempted, and thereafter fails to show any images at all.

After what feels like years of suffering from this bug, a newbie Fedora convert last week encouraged me to cure the itch. Here’s how to fix it, adapted from Mozilla’s guide for Ubuntu.

The fix

  1. Press the meta (aka “windows”) key then type terminal.
  2. Open the terminal app, then type or paste:

    sudo gedit /usr/share/applications/firefox.desktop

  3. Enter your password, hit enter.
  4. Scroll to the bottom of the text in the editor that should have opened (that’s Gedit), and look for the line that reads Exec=firefox %u
  5. Replace it with this:

    Exec=env LD_PRELOAD=/usr/lib/libGL.so.1 firefox %u

  6. Then save it (ctrl + s), and close gedit (file menu -> close).
  7. Now restart Firefox and the problem should be solved.

Explanation

What we do here is basically change the command that Linux uses to run Firefox. Instead of running it directly (%u means use the same window if new links are opened, instead of creating new ones), we preload a graphics library first (libGL). That graphics library handles the fullscreen switching properly.

Good luck!


Tip: install Hebrew fonts on Fedora Linux

Here’s a one line command that will install additional Hebrew fonts on Fedora 20. There’s a fair few in here, including a Free version of Hebrew Arial (much sought after). They’re all in repositories already so with yum it’s a breeze:

sudo yum install culmus-* alef-fonts* google-noto-sans-hebrew-fonts



Fix Fedora 20: “Warning could not boot”

So you’re in front of your shiny new laptop / netbook/ ultrabook / toaster, you’ve put Fedora 20 on a USB stick, filled up the progress guitar pick, only to be dropped to an emergency shell with errors like:

dracut-initqueue[398]: Warning: Could not boot.
dracut-initqueue[398]: Warning: /dev/disk/by-label/Fedora-Live-Desktop-x86_64-20-1 does not exist
Starting Dracut Emergency Shell...
Warning: /dev/disk/by-label/Fedora-Live-Desktop-x86_64-20-1 does not exist
Warning: /dev/mapper/live-rw does not exist

Continue Reading


How to fix Fedora 19 “unlockable lockscreen” bug

The problem

So you’re using Fedora 19, you update yum one day, and a few days later you find some strange lockscreen behaviour. The look of your lockscreen has changed – a different background colour, clock size, and password box positioning. So far so good. But wait, why does a second lockscreen appear after you shoo away the first? Why can’t you type your password to the input field? Why can’t you get back to your desktop and unsaved work? Continue Reading


Free up disk space on /boot partition on Fedora

Had an error like this while upgrading your system lately?:

insufficient disk space
need 40M free on /boot (0M free)

If so, it’s likely because you have lots of kernels installed and the automatic size of your /boot partition, as configured during Fedora’s installation wizard, has become insufficient. In my case I have real-time kernels installed from Standford University’s CCRMA repos, in addition to the standard Fedora kernels. Here’s how to free up some space. Continue Reading


Install Ardour 3.1 on Fedora

Ardour 3 is the most powerful Free Software music software currently available. Although Fedora isn’t a GNU/Linux distribution that’s designed for audio professionals, with a little work it can be configured to process sound with low-latency (without 20+ millisecond delays or artefacts like pops and crackles), and get easy access to repositories with many recent pro-audio apps.

We’ll compile Ardour from its source code in this tutorial, because this will get us the very latest version (with features and bug fixes missing from older copies), and because Ardour recently switched to a payment-oriented package distribution model which promotes source compilation as the installation method for people who aren’t Ardour donors.

We’ll also set up the CCRMA package repositories, which contain many audio apps not found in the default Fedora repos, and most importantly will supply us with a real time kernel (which Ardour, and low-latency operation in general, requires). The CCRMA repos are provided by the Stanford Center for Computer Research in Music and Acoustics.

These instructions are designed to work with Fedora 18 and Ardour 3.1.1, though I expect they will work as well with later versions of both. If not, let me know and I’ll try and tweak the guide.

  1. Install package dependencies required by Ardour:
    yum install git jack-audio-connection-kit-devel libsndfile-devel liblo-devel aubio-devel cppunit-devel cwiid-devel liblrdf-devel libsamplerate-devel lv2-devel serd-devel sord-devel sratom-devel lilv-devel flac-devel gtkmm-2.4-devel gtkmm24-devel libgnomecanvas-devel libgnomecanvasmm26-devel suil-devel libcurl libcurl-devel uuid uuid-devel libuuid libuuid-devel lib fftw3 fftw3-devel liboggz liboggz-devel
  2. Setup the CCRMA repositories (more detailed info in the Fedora manual):
    su -c 'rpm -Uvh http://ccrma.stanford.edu/planetccrma/mirror/fedora/linux/
    planetccrma/13/i386/planetccrma-repo-1.1-2.fc13.ccrma.noarch.rpm
  3. Update existing packages and refresh what’s available:
    yum update
  4. Install real-time (low-latency) kernel and drivers from CCRMA:
    yum install planetccrma-core
  5. Reboot your machine to use your new real-time kernel.
  6. Download Ardour via  Git and compile it by following the simple official instructions (see “Building Ardour 3.x”). I recommend not installing Ardour unless you really need to (installing is the final step in the official instructions that simply creates links within Fedora’s menus etc. and isn’t required for compiling / running / using Ardour).
  7. Start the jack sound server by running qjackctl (either from system menu or CLI), and click on “start”.
  8. Run your newly compiled Ardour (execute this from within the directory you compiled Ardour in):
    cd gtk2_ardour
    ./ardev

Those are all the necessary steps and you should now have a fully functional copy of Ardour! I recommend installing some additional LV2 plugins however to extend the built-in MIDI instruments that are available within Ardour.

  1. (Optional) Install additional synthesisers for Ardour:

sudo yum install lv2-triceratops lv2-synthv1 lv2-calf-plugins lv2-calf-plugins lv2-mdaEPiano

Those synths should appear automatically as available MIDI instruments when you restart Ardour.

I hope that running Ardour in the way I’ve described will whet your appetite to dive more deeply into audio production on GNU/Linux. If so, I recommend using a dedicated GNU/Linux distribution for audio work, because it’ll provide you with many more tools and features, and save you having to manually configure them all yourself. For now KXStudio is my clear favourite.

Good luck, and let me know how you get on in the comments 🙂


Run ownCloud Cucumber tests on Fedora 17

ownCloud uses automated testing to check for problems, and writing and executing these tests is important for any contributor. In my capacity as an ownCloud systems developer I use these tests to quickly verify that my apps don’t break after merging or pulling new code. For those less familiar with Ruby however, getting the Cucumber based behaviour tests running can be confusing. Here’s how to do it on Fedora.

  • Install the necessary dependencies:
    sudo yum install libxslt libxslt-devel libyaml libyaml-devel xorg-x11-server-Xvfb openssl-devel
  • Install RVM. If you have previously installed it, you may need to reinstall it so that the newly available libraries are used:
    sudo rvm install 1.9.3
  • Install the Selenium gem:
    sudo gem install selenium-webdriver
  • Clone the acceptance-testing repository from GitHub:
    git clone https://github.com/owncloud/acceptance-testing
  • Switch to root (su), and enter the newly created directory (this will trigger the .rvmrc shell script):
    cd acceptance-testing
  • Accept the warning and agree to run the script
  • If the script encounters errors (e.g. “RVM not found” or “RVM is not a function”), then open a new terminal, and repeat steps from “Switch to root”.
  • If you are testing a copy of ownCloud running locally on your machine, start your webserver, e.g.:
    service httpd start
  • Run cucumber to execute the tests:
    cucumber HOST=foo.bar.com features

Install Android Emulator in Fedora 17

Android emulator allows you to test apps and websites from an Android user’s perspective, without the need for a physical Android device. The Emulator does not work “out of the box” in Fedora however, and only a version for 32-bit machines is provided. Additional packages are required, and the GUI must be started from the command line. These steps are designed for 64-bit machines, but they should also work on 32-bit ones as well.
android emulator screenshot

  1. Install the additional packages which the emulator depends upon:
    yum install libstdc++.i686 glibc.i686 ncurses-libs.i686 libstdc libstdc++.i686 libzip.i686 libX11.i686 libXrandr.i686 SDL.i686
  2. Download the Linux edition of the emulator from Google: http://developer.android.com/sdk/index.html
  3. Extract the downloaded archive (open your Downloads folder right click on the file, “extract here”)
  4. Open a terminal, change directory to the folder you have just extracted:
    cd ~/Downloads/android-sdk-linux/
  5. Run the emulator:
    tools/android
  6. Once the repository has automatically updated itself, download the packages that have been automatically selected for you (click “install packages”)
  7. Open the Virtual Device manage window from the menu: “tools” > “Manage AVDs”
  8. Click “new” to create a new AVD, use default settings
  9. Highlight your new device and click “start”, then “launch”

The emulator should now boot up after a few seconds and allow you to use the device.


Install Webgen in Fedora 17 with Ruby 1.8.6 and RVM

Webgen does not work with new versions of Ruby. Using Webgen installed using ruby and rubygems from Fedora repos results in errors including “obsolete and deprecated Config”.

To get webgen to work, we will use RVM (Ruby Version Manager). This allows you install multiple versions of ruby side by side. RVM is not available in Fedora repositories, and must be manually installed.

  1. If you have already installed ruby from a repository, remove it:

    yum remove ruby ruby-libs rubygems

  2. As root, install RVM, and follow the on-screen instructions:

    curl -L https://get.rvm.io | bash -s stable --ruby
    Note: the leading backslash () is intentional and could be important

  3. Install Ruby 1.8.6:

    rvm install 1.8.6
    Note: you can see what versions are available to install using: rvm list known

  4. Switch to use Ruby 1.8.6 by default:

    rvm use 1.8.6
    Note: You can check that it worked using: ruby -v
    Note: If you want this to be permanent, for all shells, and not just the terminal you’re currently using, execute: rvm use 1.8.6 –default

  5. Install webgen:

    gem install webgen

  6. That’s it! Good luck.

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