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Posts tagged with: fedora

Install Rar in Fedora 17: make rar archive files

Plenty of resources explain how to install unrar support in Fedora, but what about when you need to create rar files, instead of merely extracting them?

Rar has licensing issues which is why it isn’t available in standard Fedora repositories. The package ‘Unrar’ is available in rpmfusion repositories, but to get rar compression support you can install one of these two non-Free packages:

rar-3.8.0-1.el6.rf.i686.rpm (32 bit)
rar-3.8.0-1.el6.rf.x86_64.rpm (64 bit)

View web pages on a local web server from a virtual machine on Fedora 17

These instructions will allow you to view web pages that are served by your local web development server from within a virtual machine.

Example scenario: you run a local web server on Fedora for development, and you want to test your local site pages from within another operating system which is running in a virtual machine, e.g. to test compatibility with Internet Explorer 9. The below method saves you from having to upload your development files somewhere remote – you can keep all your development local and also try out your pages on all platforms.

1. Install VirtualBox from https://www.virtualbox.org/. Download the .rpm and install it via GUI or commandline

Note: Using either Virtual Machine Manager, or VirtualBox from the rpmfusion repositories does not work.

2. Install and boot your desired OS in VirtualBox (I’ll assume that this is Windows)

3. Edit and save the hosts file of the guest OS to include entries for each of the local websites that you wish to access from the virtual machine. The site names should be identical to the ones in your Fedora /etc/hosts file:

10.0.2.2 local.mysite example.devsite

Note: on Windows saving the hosts file takes effect immediately. On Windows the file is located at c:windowssystem32driversetchosts

Note: Windows 7 requires an additional step to edit the hosts file

4. Start Apache on your host machine, if it isn’t already running

5. On the virtual machine visit example.devsite in a web browser

UPDATE: If you encounter problems when starting your virtual machine relating to kernel modules, try the following:

yum install gcc kernel-devel kernel-headers kernel-PAE-devel

/etc/init.d/vboxdrv setup


Install GTimeLog time tracker on Fedora GNU/Linux

GTimeLog is a simple and effective time tracking application for GNU/Linux. It is the preferred tool of top FSFE staff. It is not currently available in official Fedora repositories however, so in order to use it you must manually install it using Python. Fortunately this is simple to do. These instructions were originally written for Fedora 16, but should also work on 17.

Download GTimeLog from the official website:

http://pypi.python.org/pypi/gtimelog#downloads

Extract the downloaded file from the command line:

tar -xzf gtimelog-0.7.1.tar.gz

Enter the newly extracted directory from the command line:

cd gtimelog-0.7.1

Install dependencies from the command line:

sudo yum install python2 pygtk2

Install GTimeLog from the command line:

sudo python setup.py install

GTimeLog should now be installed. You can run it by pressing Alt+F2 and typing gtimelog [enter] in Gnome and KDE.

UPDATE

By default GTimeLog is unable to generate reports of weekly and monthly statistics etc. due to a dependency on the command line mail client Mutt. Mutt isn’t for everybody, and most likely it won’t be installed on your system either. To access generated reports in Gedit text editor, edit the GTimeLog config file using nano:

nano ~/.gtimelog/gtimelogrc

and set “mailer” to Gedit:

mailer = gedit %s

Alternatively you can set the mailer to Kmail, if you’re using Kontact or Kmail, and wish to send your reports as emails (don’t forget to change [email address] and [name] to your own values):

mailer = kmail --subject "Weekly report for [name]" --msg %s [recipient email address]

UPDATE 14.03.13

Version 0.8.1 was released last month. You can upgrade by simply following the original installation instructions again with a fresh copy of 0.8.1. Fedora users who recently upgraded to Fedora 18 from an older version will need to perform this update to use GTimeLog again.



Set up a local web development server on Fedora 16 with Apache

The following procedure allows you to run your own webserver on Fedora 16, so that you can develop web scripts and applications and test them locally without an Internet connection. I assume that you’re using Gnome 3. Run the stated commands in a terminal – accessible via alt+F2, enter: gnome-terminal [press enter]

Login as root:

su

Install the Apache webserver:

yum install httpd

Configure Apache to handle requests to your local website:

nano /etc/httpd/conf/httpd.conf

Navigate to the end of that file using your arrow keys, or the page down button, and add the following text at the bottom. Replace the text in {} with whatever suits your setup

<VirtualHost *:80>
DocumentRoot {PATH TO YOUR WEB FILES (THE SPECIFIED FOLDER MUST EXIST), E.G.: /var/www/mysite}
ServerName {ADDRESS TO ACCESS YOUR WEBSITE IN A BROWSER BY, E.G.: local.mysite}
</VirtualHost>

The actual text that you add might look like this:

<VirtualHost *:80>
DocumentRoot /var/www/mysite
ServerName local.mysite
</VirtualHost>

Save and close the file:

ctrl+x [enter]

y [enter]

Configure your hosts file to route requests for your website to Apache:

nano /etc/hosts

Add to the end of this file the following text:

127.0.0.1   {ADDRESS TO ACCESS YOUR WEBSITE IN A BROWSER BY, E.G.: local.mysite}

The actual text that you add might look like this:

127.0.0.1    local.mysite

Save and close the file:

ctrl+x [enter]

y [enter]

Restart Apache:

service httpd restart

Your website should now be accessible in a website via whatever address you specified above, e.g. local.mysite (note not www.local.mysite).

(Optional) Configure file permissions:

If your website is still not accessible, you may have a file permissions issue. You can temporarily disable selinux to see if that is causing the problem. If that doesn’t help, you can use a permissions debugging tool to find problems with your UNIX file permissions.



Get wireless working on Fedora with BCM4313

Device:

BCM4313 802.11b/g/n Wireless LAN Controller (rev 01)

This is the built-in wifi on the Lenovo B570 (and many other laptops).

[UPDATE: As of updates applied on 15.04.12, wifi is again broken (curse you Fedora and your inadequate testing suites!) – I’m currently working on finding a fix ]

[UPDATE: The fix is to connect temporarily using another method (ethernet cable, 3G, or wifi dongle), update your system using yum update, and then reboot. This should hopefully fix the issue. Apparently after using yum update to install the broken updates you can often run yum update immediately after to fix it. See here for a thread with more info ]

[UPDATE 19.03.13: If you have problems with dependencies during updates, follow the advice stated here. It relates to a nVidia kmod package, but the instructions apply for kmod-wl also. Just replace “kmod-nvidia” with “kmod-wl”]

The following procedure gets this chip working for me with Fedora 16 / 17 / 18 (run the commands in a terminal – accessible via alt+F2, enter: gnome-terminal [press enter]

Enable rmpfusion repos:

Follow this guide: http://rpmfusion.org/Configuration

Login as root:

su

Update to latest packages and kernel:

yum update

Install kmod-wl and wl-broadcom:

yum install broadcom-wl kmod-wl

Blacklist acer_wmi, dell_wmi and bcma:

nano /etc/modprobe.d/blacklist.conf

[add the following lines to the end of this file:]

# blacklisted to get broadcom 4313 wireless to work
blacklist acer_wmi
blacklist dell_wmi
blacklist bcma

Restart network manager:

service NetworkManager restart

Try and connect as usual using the Gnome 3 network manager applet


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